Public Art Category

Sculpture

Three-dimensional or relief forms, either abstract or realistic. Traditionally carved stone or wood, constructed objects, cast forms, woven fiber or shaped materials of some type. Sculpture can also integrate other media, such as light, sound, or kinetic movement.

September 17, 2014

Old and New in Rhode Island

Tradition and innovation merge to benefit the community

Rhode Island (2011) – The recent unveiling of Maya Lin’s design The Meeting Room—a park redesign intended to improve and reenergize Queen Anne Square in the center of Newport, Rhode Island—reveals the challenges involved in placing public art in Rhode Island. This state prides itself on being home to more historic structures per capita than … Read More

Martina Windels | On Location, Public Art Review

September 12, 2014

Giants Unveiled at Vancouver Biennale

(Vancouver, B.C.) – The 3rd Vancouver Biennale is currently underway in Canada. This celebration of public art will continue to unveil exciting new works throughout its two-year duration. The theme is “Open Borders / Crossroads Vancouver” and features a wide variety of work by local, international, emerging and well-known artists. With the exhibition spread throughout … Read More

Public Art Review | News, Public Art Review

September 5, 2014

Wide-Open Spaces

Yinka Shonibare on why he turned his London studio into a “mini-community”

Hossein Amirsadeghi: What role does the studio play in your work? Yinka Shonibare: The studio is something productive for me, but not only in relation to the creation of art objects. It is divided into two parts. The top part is where I do my production meetings and my drawings and paintings. But I also … Read More

Hossein Amirsadeghi | Featured, Public Art Review

September 3, 2014

Purl Jammers

Yarn bombers celebrate their colorful craft with an international festival

On June 7, knitters around the world brandished their needles and skeins to celebrate International Yarn Bombing Day. Yarn bombers wrap the urban landscape—lampposts, tree limbs, bicycles— with colorful knitted creations. It’s a playful twist on ephemeral street art like graffiti, and its following has grown exponentially since its emergence in the early 2000s, prompted … Read More

Amelia Foster | Featured, Public Art Review

September 1, 2014

Back in the Game

Art returns to sports stadiums

From the Archives (2012) – New sports stadiums in America are incorporating increasing amounts of public art, and this is fitting. The art adds value to fans seeking a “destination experience,” and support for artists can console some cultures that oppose public funding of stadium construction. There is an intrinsic connection, too: the affinity between … Read More

August 27, 2014

The 3D Revolution

New technology gives artists a novel way to build models and fabricate works

No matter how much trouble the creators of digital tech may be having actually creating popular new products these days—and they are having trouble—they continue to hype the novelty and game-changing capabilities of each new bit of soft- or hardware. There is one digital area, however, that so powerfully combines an unlikely premise with an … Read More

August 25, 2014

Where People Gather

Maya Lin’s work on the Confluence Project honors the past, and the project’s new executive director reaches out to the public on behalf of the future

Back in 1999, when Vancouver, Washington, nonprofit leader Jane Jacobsen first learned of a potential $500,000 gift to fund a public art project commemorating the upcoming bicentennial of the Lewis and Clark Corps of Discovery Expedition, the bare outline of how to spend the money was immediately obvious. “Let’s start in the West, where Lewis … Read More

Jacqueline White | On Location, Public Art Review

August 20, 2014

Culture in Motion

A mobile, inflatable auditorium brings arts programming to a tsunami-devastated region of Japan

On March 11, 2011, a magnitude-9 earthquake, one of the most powerful in recorded history, hit Japan, and was followed by a devastating tsunami. The catastrophe claimed more than 18,000 lives and left vast swathes of the northeast severely damaged if not destroyed. In the Tohoku region, whole towns were swept away; the force of … Read More

August 15, 2014

The New City-Makers

Six lessons public artists can teach us about how to make our cities better

Something strange is happening in our cities. Given the somber state of our economic, environmental, and social progress, one would expect cities to be in serious trouble. After all, a growing majority of the world’s population lives in them (84 percent in the United States, according to the last census), where they consume an ever-growing … Read More

August 8, 2014

Standing at the Gateway

Public art projects in St. Louis are reconnecting the city’s fragmented infrastructure—and its people

Word for word, no public artwork in St. Louis has been discussed more than Richard Serra’s Twain. It’s been disparaged at dinner parties, criticized in the newspaper, and one vandal-critic even spray-painted “GET RID OF THIS THING!” on its weathered Cor-Ten surface. Located on the Gateway Mall, a block-wide park that ribbons through downtown, Twain … Read More

Stefene Russell | On Location, Public Art Review