Featured

November 15, 2017

Thiago Mundano: 2017 IAPA Winner

Pimp My Carroça, São Paulo, Brazil, 2007

Brazilian street artist Thiago Mundano has been named the winner of the 2017 International Award for Public Art (IAPA) for his project Pimp My Carroça. The project began in 2007 when Mundano approached São Paulo’s unofficial garbage-collection workers with a proposal: he and artist colleagues would give their carts—carroças—a colorful makeover. The goal: make the … Read More

Public Art Review | Featured, Public Art Review

November 15, 2017

A Creative Community Discovered

The Wildflowers Institute’s unique approach to highlighting informal local networks is helping under-the-radar artists in San Francisco’s Tenderloin find their voices—and each other

Gayle Rosemond’s day wasn’t going particularly well. Returning from the laundromat, she discovered she’d locked herself out of her room at the Pierre, a hotel that had been converted to an SRO, or single-room occupancy building, in the Tenderloin district of San Francisco, a 50-block area that’s the poorest in the city, yet abuts the … Read More

Jacqueline White | Featured, On Location, Public Art Review

November 15, 2017

Resist

Artists ask us to rise up

Art is resistance. Resistance can be defined as “the refusal to accept or comply,” and artists, by their very nature, question what is and why. They dig beneath the surface to get at the human essence. Throughout our history, art and artists have resisted oppression, violence, injustice, and inequality. Today, at an unprecedented moment in … Read More

November 8, 2017

Micro-housing in Beijing

Starting in 2010, Zhang Ke led a team that used alleyway design to revitalize Beijing neighborhoods

Under the aegis of the city’s official design showcase, Beijing Design Week (BJDW), architects and designers are making interventions into two traditional Beijing neighborhoods that are both innovative and respectful of scale and tradition. Dazhalan (Dashilar in the Beijing dialect) is an 800-year-old neighborhood not far from Tiananmen Square that became the city’s main business … Read More

November 8, 2017

Flows Two Ways

by Stephen Glassman

NEW YORK – Without Stephen Glassman’s eight-story-tall sculpture Flows Two Ways, the view out of the primarily subsidized, middle-income apartments at Via 57 West, a new mixed-use and residential high-rise on the West Side of Manhattan, would have been a concrete wall. Instead, residents now see a 3,600-square-foot sculpture that looks like the Hudson River at … Read More

October 19, 2017

Dance of the Leaves—and the Data

Climate-data-based music accompanies tree-ballerinas in a unique arboreal performance in Oregon

BEND, Ore. – The fact that trees are wearing tutus is not the only remarkable thing about Arbor Ballet, an installation and performance, conceived by public artist Helen Lessick, that premiered in Bend, Oregon on October 5. It’s got some highly original, science-based music to go with it. Lessick outfitted ten of the trees in … Read More

October 19, 2017

Wild Style on the High Plains: RedCan Graffiti Jam

PAR57 sneak peek

EAGLE BUTTE, S.D. – The Cheyenne River Youth Project (CRYP) is harnessing a controversial artistic medium—graffiti—to reclaim and revitalize traditional Lakota narratives and values, as part of a broader strategy to engage, educate, and empower indigenous youth in America’s fourth largest tribal reservation in Eagle Butte, South Dakota. RedCan is a ‘graffiti jam’ spearheaded by … Read More

Public Art Review | Featured, Public Art Review

September 20, 2017

Mural Honoring Native Women to Be Unveiled in Minnesota

Duluth artwork focuses on their resilience, resistance

DULUTH, Minn. – On Saturday, September 23 the American Indian Community Housing Organization will unveil a vibrant new mural on its new Dr. Robert Powless Community Center in downtown Duluth. The as-yet-untitled work, painted by Los Angeles-based Votan Ik (Mayan) with assistants Derek Brown (Diné) and Leah Lewis (Pueblo), was completed in collaboration with the … Read More

Public Art Review | News, Public Art Review

September 7, 2017

Oystermen

Artist: Marco Casagrande

Sculptures provide homes for tiny ocean residents. The island of Kinmen, Taiwan—where oyster cultivation is a long-standing tradition—was the final flashpoint of the Chinese Civil War in 1949. More recently, Finnish environmental artist and architect Marco Casagrande noticed that rusted steel anti-landing poles still standing in the waters around the island are covered in oysters—and … Read More

August 28, 2017

Walking a Watermelon in Cairo

by Heba Amin

CAIRO – In parts of the Arab world, watermelon is a term for nonsense, a joke, or a sham. Egyptian artist Heba Amin has put the fruit to work in her art. In 2015, she was part of a group of graffiti artists hired by the TV show Homeland to decorate street scenes in a … Read More

Public Art Review | Public Art Review, Recent Projects

August 24, 2017

Breathing Lights

by Adam Frelin and Barbara Nelson

ALBANY, SCHENECTADY, and TROY, N.Y. – Every night for several weeks in autumn 2016, a warm glow lit the windows of hundreds of usually dark, vacant homes across Albany, Schenectady, and Troy, New York. For a short period, these empty spaces gained new life—or, at least, the feeling of life. By illuminating dark properties, Breathing Lights … Read More

August 11, 2017

Newcomers Calling

In three salvaged Times Square phone booths, you can listen to the voices of recent immigrants

NEW YORK – The public telephone has joined the VHS tape and the floppy disc as a relic of a (rather recently) bygone era. But three repurposed phone booths in a section of New York’s Times Square are finding new lives as the sites of some very 21st-century messaging. Aman Mojadidi’s project Once Upon a … Read More

Public Art Review | Public Art Review, Recent Projects