Featured

September 20, 2017

Mural Honoring Native Women to Be Unveiled in Minnesota

Duluth artwork focuses on their resilience, resistance

DULUTH, Minn. – On Saturday, September 23 the American Indian Community Housing Organization will unveil a vibrant new mural on its new Dr. Robert Powless Community Center in downtown Duluth. The as-yet-untitled work, painted by Los Angeles-based Votan Ik (Mayan) with assistants Derek Brown (Diné) and Leah Lewis (Pueblo), was completed in collaboration with the … Read More

September 7, 2017

Oystermen

Artist: Marco Casagrande

Sculptures provide homes for tiny ocean residents. The island of Kinmen, Taiwan—where oyster cultivation is a long-standing tradition—was the final flashpoint of the Chinese Civil War in 1949. More recently, Finnish environmental artist and architect Marco Casagrande noticed that rusted steel anti-landing poles still standing in the waters around the island are covered in oysters—and … Read More

August 28, 2017

Walking a Watermelon in Cairo

by Heba Amin

CAIRO – In parts of the Arab world, watermelon is a term for nonsense, a joke, or a sham. Egyptian artist Heba Amin has put the fruit to work in her art. In 2015, she was part of a group of graffiti artists hired by the TV show Homeland to decorate street scenes in a … Read More

August 24, 2017

Breathing Lights

by Adam Frelin and Barbara Nelson

ALBANY, SCHENECTADY, and TROY, N.Y. – Every night for several weeks in autumn 2016, a warm glow lit the windows of hundreds of usually dark, vacant homes across Albany, Schenectady, and Troy, New York. For a short period, these empty spaces gained new life—or, at least, the feeling of life. By illuminating dark properties, Breathing Lights … Read More

August 11, 2017

Newcomers Calling

In three salvaged Times Square phone booths, you can listen to the voices of recent immigrants

NEW YORK – The public telephone has joined the VHS tape and the floppy disc as a relic of a (rather recently) bygone era. But three repurposed phone booths in a section of New York’s Times Square are finding new lives as the sites of some very 21st-century messaging. Aman Mojadidi’s project Once Upon a … Read More

Public Art Review | Featured, Public Art Review

August 2, 2017

Free for the Rich?

Irish artist hacks a gallery’s admission policy in gentrification protest

DUBLIN – Nobody can accuse Kerry Guinan of half measures. The Dublin artist, who graduated from Ireland’s National College of Art and Design (NCAD) in 2014, has not only exhibited throughout Ireland and in the Netherlands, but she’s intervened in Irish politics too, running for the Dáil (parliament) in 2016 on a platform that included … Read More

Public Art Review | Featured, Public Art Review

July 25, 2017

Indianapolis Neighborhood Renewal Project to Include a Crime-Fighting Arts Initiative

Indy East Art Peace’s aim: Create beauty to foil felons

INDIANAPOLIS – An ambitious program to restore and build homes in Indianapolis’ struggling Near Eastside neighborhood is getting an art-oriented boost, thanks to a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. The 46201 Project, named for the neighborhood’s area code and spearheaded by the Shepherd Community Center, aims to refurbish from 80 to 100 … Read More

Public Art Review | News, Public Art Review

July 19, 2017

People’s Expungement Clinics

by the People’s Paper Co-Op

PHILADELPHIA – A minor felony conviction like drug possession can be a ball and chain for people who have served their time and are trying to turn their lives around. But in many states, a process known as expungement allows such offenders to seal off their records from employers and landlords doing background checks. In … Read More

July 13, 2017

Lost Man Creek

by Spencer Finch and the Save the Redwoods League

Right now, you can go visit an artwork in the form of a living redwood forest in downtown Brooklyn. A 4,500-square-foot oasis of calm, Lost Man Creek by Spencer Finch in collaboration with the Save the Redwoods League is a 1:100 scale recreation of a 790-acre protected, inaccessible section of California’s Redwood National Park. The … Read More

Public Art Review | Public Art Review, Recent Projects

July 12, 2017

Public Servants

Essays grapple with the changing meaning of the “public” and the evolving roles of art

Public Servants is the second book in the revived Critical Anthologies in Art and Culture series, whose first run, between 1984 and 2004, produced six volumes—including Art After Modernism: Rethinking Representation, which became a critical classic by taking up the challenge of defining postmodernism in its early phase. Public Servants is just as much of … Read More

Jon Spayde | Books, Public Art Review

July 11, 2017

Designing The Future, Freestyle

Hip Hop Architecture Camps invite inner-city kids to mold their communities.

VIDEO – There’s no end to the prescriptions that adult pundits make for dealing with urban issues. But how would a preteen or teenager who lives in an inner-city community rethink and remake his or her environment? Answers will emerge from the Hip Hop Architecture Camps, cosponsored by the Urban Arts Collective, the Universal Hip … Read More

Public Art Review | News, Public Art Review

June 28, 2017

Richard Florida’s Top-Down Urbanism

The “creative class” prophet’s prescriptions for today’s urban ills don’t get at the real problems

A decade and a half ago Richard Florida’s “creative class” research became a sensation and opened new avenues of dialogue among city leaders around the world. At the same time, his emphasis on shaping cities in the interests of that privileged subset of citizens has had a very mixed legacy. If you’ve heard Florida speak, … Read More

Tom Borrup | Books, Public Art Review