Public Art Review

June 16, 2017

Rolling Rez Arts Is On the Road Again

A unique mobile art and banking space is bringing mentoring and financial help to Native artists.

PINE RIDGE, SD – The vehicle is impossible to miss: a big truck adorned with stylized buffalo in bright colors. It crisscrosses the Connecticut-size Pine Ridge reservation in South Dakota, connecting Native artists with one another while helping them ratchet up their artistic and financial skills. Rolling Rez Arts is a joint project of three … Read More

Public Art Review | Public Art Review, Recent Projects

June 15, 2017

Hard Work in a Hybrid Space

Public art administrators have to handle demands from multiple stakeholders, private and public—while staying true to mission (and as upbeat as possible)

TWIN CITIES – Public art program administrators and their colleagues who run public-art-oriented nonprofits need to be negotiators. Not only do they have to talk a good game about their projects, they have to negotiate the conflicting demands of multiple stakeholders: artists, community groups, government entities, private-sector players like developers and building owners, and anybody … Read More

Sheila Regan | On Location, Public Art Review

June 7, 2017

Street Art Museum Update

Two new projects for housing outdoor urban art challenge the museum paradigm

AMSTERDAM / BERLIN – More and more, partisans of street art are creating museum settings for this basically anarchic genre—and the museums are proving to be as rule-breaking as the art. Berlin’s architecturally innovative, soon-to-open Urban Nation Museum for Urban Contemporary Art—see photo—and the buildingless Street Art Museum Amsterdam (SAMA) are profiled in the latest … Read More

Public Art Review | News, Public Art Review

June 1, 2017

What Are We Risking?

An interview with Carlton Turner

Carlton Turner is all about creating narratives: true narratives that challenge lazy assumptions about the world and what art and artists are—narratives that confront false limitations on what art can say and how it can change the world. Since 2001, Turner has worked with Alternate ROOTS, a regional arts membership organization based in Atlanta; he … Read More

May 23, 2017

Looking for CETA

Tracking the impact of the 1970s federal program that employed artists

There are so many reasons to celebrate what the Comprehensive Employment and Training Act (CETA) did for the arts in the 1970s, but it’s difficult because the evidence is practically invisible. CETA was a federal jobs program that, like the Works Progress Administration (WPA) before it, funneled many hundreds of millions of dollars to visual … Read More

Linda Frye Burnham and Steven Durland | Featured, Magazine Feature, Public Art Review

May 17, 2017

Rethinking a City from the Grassroots

An artist-led urbanism project invites ideas from everyone for molding the capital of Moldova

CHISINAU, Moldova – One of the semifinalists for the International Award for Public Art (highlighted in the new issue of Public Art Review) was an insouciant project called Flat Space, in which the artists and designers of the Oberliht Association in Chisinau (formerly Kishinev), Moldova reconstructed a drab socialist apartment from the era when the … Read More

Public Art Review | Public Art Review, Recent Projects

May 17, 2017

An Engaged Gathering in Chicago

Open Engagement 2017 was a forum for socially-focused arts

Under the resonant rubric “Justice,” the 2017 Open Engagement (OE) conference was held April 21-23 at the University of Illinois at Chicago and other sites across the city.   The gathering of artists and others involved in socially engaged art offered more than 100 workshops, presentations, panels, conversations, tours, parties and projects, all focused on … Read More

Public Art Review | News, Public Art Review

April 14, 2017

Winner! 3rd International Award for Public Art

Caring for the collectors

WINNER: Pimp My Carroça, Thiago Mundano, São Paulo, Brazil, 2007 In São Paulo, 17,000 tons of waste are generated each day, and only 1 percent of it is recycled; but of this recycled material, 90 percent is collected by the 20,000 or so people who man the carroças, the city’s garbage collection carts, picking up … Read More

Jon Spayde | News, Public Art Review

March 31, 2017

The Makeover of Milan’s “Rainbow Tower”

A beloved civic symbol got a major refurbishment just in time for a world’s fair

MILAN – In a world where public art is in danger of deterioration because of maintenance-budget restrictions, forgetfulness, or the sheer complexity of city life, some works are simply too iconic not to refurbish. Case in point: The 2015 makeover of the “Rainbow Tower” (Torre Arcobaleno) near Milan’s fashionable, design-conscious Garibaldi district. Built in 1964 … Read More

Public Art Review | On Location, Public Art Review

March 27, 2017

Monumental Problems

A public-art historian argues that “victim memorials” obscure the causes and contexts of our national ills

Designed by architect Maya Ying Lin in 1981, the Vietnam Veterans Memorial (VVM) on the National Mall is, according to author Harriet F. Senie, the “most visited and copied memorial in American history.” At first blush, this seems a positive phenomenon, if only because the tapered wall’s uncomplicated design contrasts so starkly with many of the … Read More

David Schimke | Books, Public Art Review

March 23, 2017

Signs of Things to Come?

Street artist Plastic Jesus marks the “sites” of “future internment camps”

“Lot Reserved for: Future Internment Camp,” said signs posted at industrial sites, empty lots, and other spaces in multiple American cities in early March. “By order: Donald J. Trump. President United States of America/ Executive order 9066.” The project, by the Los Angeles artist who calls himself Plastic Jesus, was a dystopian elaboration of Trump’s … Read More

Public Art Review | Public Art Review, Recent Projects

March 17, 2017

Seven Magic Mountains

Artist: Ugo Rondinone

LAS VEGAS – Half an hour outside Las Vegas, seven striking cairns in a neat row rise 30 feet from the desert floor. In form, these structures resemble hoodoos—tall and spindly natural rock formations commonly seen in the western United States—but if their isolated placement doesn’t signal artificial origins, their intense color erases any doubt. … Read More