Forecast Public Art http://forecastpublicart.org Wed, 04 Mar 2015 13:00:40 +0000 en-US hourly 1 Interview: JR http://forecastpublicart.org/public-art-review/2015/03/interview-jr/ http://forecastpublicart.org/public-art-review/2015/03/interview-jr/#comments Wed, 04 Mar 2015 13:00:40 +0000 http://forecastpublicart.org/?p=8728 Born in 1983 in France, JR began his career surreptitiously tagging around Paris. In the last decade he has reached audiences all around the globe, carrying out public projects focusing on the human face and its symbolic power. After he won significant financial support in the form of the 2011 TED Prize, JR created the … Read More

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Born in 1983 in France, JR began his career surreptitiously tagging around Paris. In the last decade he has reached audiences all around the globe, carrying out public projects focusing on the human face and its symbolic power.

After he won significant financial support in the form of the 2011 TED Prize, JR created the Inside Out project. A documentary by the same name follows JR around the world as he encourages communities to define their most important causes through powerful and giant black and white portraits pasted in the street.

JR’s most recent project, UnframedEllis Island, recently opened to the public. George Slade spoke with him by mobile phone while he was working on the installation on a late morning in August.

 

George Slade: So where are you?

JR: I’m taking the boat to go to Ellis Island. I’m working on Ellis Island. It was the port of entry for immigration a hundred years ago. They open half of the island for tourists, which is what millions of visitors visit every year. But other parts have never been seen by the public since they closed it. So you have half of the island, which is completely abandoned, with hospital facilities, offices—everything is completely closed. We are working there, placing artwork there.

The visitor will be able to walk through and see it on a guided tour. It’s a really special project for me because it’s the first time that on such a site I’ll be able to do an exhibition that will actually be visible to the public, instead of doing artwork in this kind of place and then later showing the photo in the gallery. This time, people will really be able to go in this historical place to see the work, and I love that.

This is a project commissioned by the Ellis Island Museum. Will it be somewhat more permanently installed, or will it be wheat paste and paper?

The pieces should be semi-permanent. They are going to open on the first of October, and our contract says that we need to re-paste in case it gets damaged. It’s going to be the first time they show this place, and if things go well, they’re going to keep it running all the time, and those artworks will be there for good. So, for me, it’s fascinating to suddenly work jointly with a national monument or museum to leave something that generations can see.

Why had this part of the island not been open before? Because it was dangerous or unimproved?

First they thought they would have the financing to restore and reopen it, but it’s massive, and it’s been decaying over the years. The structures are not holding up that well. So they realize that they would never have the money. Then Hurricane Sandy damaged the structure, and they were like, okay, before we completely lose it, we better find a way to open it. They’re going to be able to take groups of 10. So it’s pretty controlled because it’s a really dangerous area.

Who are you using as collaborators in this project? Who have you gotten to be faces for you?

The photos come from the archive of Ellis Island.

When else have you used archives, faces of people who aren’t living anymore?

I did a project in 2010 named Unframed, and that project was about archive images that are not mine. It was also a way to show that I’m not only a photographer, that most of what I do is reinterpreting and using the walls or the open landscape. Basically, photography is just a medium for me, so it doesn’t matter if I take the photo or not. It’s where I place it and how I place it that matters. Those photos only make sense in this time and in this way on those doors, on those places where they actually were taken and belong to. I thought that I would only be able to do it and then people would see it in the book or a gallery, and I was really surprised when they told me that they’ve managed to secure a perimeter so that the public can actually see it.

I think photography is really just a vehicle for you, a way to convey the really important information, which is something about presence and the public.

Yeah, it’s definitely that, and it’s also definitely about connecting people and creating interactions—all kinds of interactions. In a project like Inside Out, it’s about physical interaction. I don’t take the photos, so I don’t even care how good they are because what I’m looking for is how the people will actually connect and how the people will actually paste together and have a little chat about what they’re sharing with me and the world. That’s what we’re trying to create with that project: interaction.

On a project like Ellis Island, I’m working with my team, and with the medium there, and the inspiration, and then—boom, it’s open to the public. So it’s a more classical way of working, even if on a nonclassical place, but the interaction will be more historical. It will be more what message it conveys to people, especially in this time when immigration is such a strong subject. How you put in place what happened a hundred years ago here and how we were welcoming people onto the land, how history can actually connect with the youth of today and how they can see the parallel in their own eyes.

What other projects have you done in the United States?

I’ve done a few projects here: The Wrinkles of the City in Los Angeles, the Inside Out project in Times Square. The New York City Ballet project was quite a big project—we adapted a ballet there; that was a whole experience for me. But let’s say that this is a one-of-a-kind, first project in the United States just because it would actually be a “forever” project on a place that is so important to the United States, and I’m really blessed and honored to be able to work on this one.

This brings up a question about boundaries. Can you talk a little bit about how your artistic practice crosses boundaries? Not just the accomplishment of pasting images on both sides of the Israel-Palestine wall, but more conceptual boundaries like private ideas to public realization, or illegal to permitted, or from stereotype to unique character. You’ve made a pretty fascinating transition from anonymous street artist to renowned anonymous street artist.

I think boundaries are the whole line of my work, the whole direction of my work. It’s always searching for boundaries. All my earliest projects until now basically speak about how the limits are never what we think they are. And I’m not saying I know where they are. I’m just looking for them, and the journey to look for them is the artwork. It’s not necessarily the final piece, but the journey—literally, to go in Israel, to go in Palestine. To try to paste there because everyone said it would be impossible, and then it happens to be really possible. And then I think, okay, maybe I have the wrong vision about a place.

So what I’m trying to do is raise questions, not give answers. I guess that’s always what I am looking for. I was always really surprised how much more open people were than I thought. So I’ve always questioned myself. I’d be like, whoa, I thought that would be impossible, and actually, people are helping me to do it.

Well, it seems like you’ve expanded boundaries, or at least moved them.

Exactly. Most of the time, it’s the boundaries people have in their head that are not real ones, and those are the most dangerous ones.

I love being surprised, and only art can create that surprise. Because real surprise can scare people, and that’s why they don’t take risks. But I think real artists should always look for real surprise; it can be sometimes good and sometimes bad, but that’s why, as an artist, you have to take risks.

In the Face2Face project, the one where you asked people to make funny faces, or unusual faces, or do something uncharacteristic—that was a great use of surprise.

Definitely. I asked them to do those faces because I wanted them to play the caricature of themselves, how they’re seen through the media by “the other.” So they were actually playing their own caricature, and then I always told them that they would be pasted next to an Israeli or a Palestinian, depending on the site, but always the two of them. What’s extraordinary is I thought that no one would let me paste, but people let me paste. Then I thought, when I tell them who was on the photo, they would not let the project happen. But then they actually helped paste it, even though they knew that in one of those two photos was one of their supposed enemies.

People helped so much on that project. It completely changed my vision about the place. It’s hard to believe that when you see it through the media. But when you actually experience it, then the art becomes the proof, and the journey becomes the proof. And that’s what I love working on, is those kind of projects where the journey is more interesting than the final artwork.

It was very interesting, in one of the TED Prize videos, to see the pictures of you working on the roof, working on a chimney way, way above the ground. I like the sense that gives of working in a very surreptitious way at a distance, but also establishing perspective for the newer works, the really big works.

Exactly. It’s always been about trying to have another vision from the same place. So when I was doing Paris it would be from rooftop antennae. Then in another country it would be from how I approached people and how I pasted them. But it has never been about doing illegal stuff to do illegal stuff. It was more that in some countries that was the only way of working because, especially in Israel and Palestine, we couldn’t have any authorization. Also, it wouldn’t have made sense to have authorization because, you know, suddenly, the project by government wouldn’t have the same power there as if it was brought by people.

But when I can—like here, for example, on Ellis Island—we do everything by the book because it’s another kind of project. It’s another approach, and I adapt to it. Working with institutions can still have as much impact as not working with an institution.

That reminds me of the idea of trying to make art by committee. Death by committee, you know? Your art represents the success of anti-committee art-making.

Most of the time people say, “Oh, yeah, but that was only with authorization.” The truth is that when you do something in the neighborhood and you ask everyone there if they want it and you do it with them, for me, it’s like doing a mini referendum, and so, technically, you actually have your authorization, but not legally. That’s what I like about it. When you don’t have authorization, you actually need more permission than when you do—you see? It’s because the people feel much more content because they’re going to decide and vote on the spot. So when I do works like that, everyone in the street comes, and asks questions, and interacts, and it better sound right to them because they’re going to decide if this should be up, because no one else will give you a permit; they are giving you the permit.

In the favela, if you had had police permission, you wouldn’t have been able to do that project.

Exactly. So it had to make sense to the people or the traffickers or whoever is really in control there. If not, they would have never let a project like that happen. And the police—you know, I couldn’t interact with them because they don’t have the power there. They’re the external force power, but they’re in conflict with the locals, and so there’s no harmony there, you can’t actually have a normal conversation. So you have to only have them with the people.

Do you feel in league with urban explorers?

I do. I love it, but the only thing that maybe separates me from the urban explorer is that I sometimes leave a trace behind, where they don’t. But the way I do it is that it doesn’t damage the wall. It doesn’t leave a mark that will damage the historical site. So, like here at Ellis Island, we use a special glue that can stay forever, but when you take it down, there will be no trace. The urban explorer, they’re really about discovering places no one went to, which I love and admire a lot.

But also, to give you an example, here at Ellis Island, this abandoned half will disappear slowly if they don’t have the money to renovate it. I’m pasting in some rooms that won’t be able to receive visitors for very long. They’re on the upper floor and maybe in 10 or 15 years the structure won’t be strong enough for anyone to go up there. Maybe in 25 years the building will fall and no one will have ever seen that piece of artwork. But the photo of it will actually be all that remains, and that’s a way to convey the story.

So, for the last 70 or 80 years, no one has been able to walk in that part, and no one has ever seen it. Now, today it’s going to be possible with those art walks, through those guided tours, and it’s going to re-attract interest about the site. And for me, also, the power of art is to basically talk to a younger generation, people that wouldn’t get interested in going to a museum, people that have never been to an exhibit. [It’s] the same way that I’ve done it at New York City Ballet, by re-interesting a public that normally would never go to ballet because they think it’s boring.

I want to bring the youth because maybe some of them think, “Oh, it’s cool. There’s going to be art in there. I want to go and see it.” By going and seeing this art, they can actually learn about their own history and maybe find another angle onto whatever question is raised right now about immigration.

You are, in a sense, updating the archeology of the space. You’re contributing to the history.

You know, I’d like to think that. I see the responsibility I have when I get places like that, how I approach every room, every pasting.

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2014 Grantee: Crescent Collective http://forecastpublicart.org/forecast/2015/03/2014-grantee-crescent-collective/ http://forecastpublicart.org/forecast/2015/03/2014-grantee-crescent-collective/#comments Tue, 03 Mar 2015 17:16:56 +0000 http://forecastpublicart.org/?p=9094 Aretemis Ettsen, Laura Bigger, and Teréz Iacovino, the trio that make up Crescent Collective, used their Planning Grant to research and test different hydroponic methods. Using recycled materials, they prototyped sculptures that grow food indoors. It’s public art you can eat! As cities continue to expand, their questions offer inspiration for integrating plants into the urban landscape. How … Read More

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Aretemis Ettsen, Laura Bigger, and Teréz Iacovino, the trio that make up Crescent Collective, used their Planning Grant to research and test different hydroponic methods. Using recycled materials, they prototyped sculptures that grow food indoors. It’s public art you can eat!

As cities continue to expand, their questions offer inspiration for integrating plants into the urban landscape. How might we create green spaces indoors? How can we enable a community garden to grow vertically?

Visit our Vimeo channel for more Forecast/Independent Filmmaker Project MN collaborative productions.

Special thanks to Independent Filmmaker Project MN for their support of this production.

The Artist Services Program is made possible through the generous support of the McKnight Foundation and Jerome Foundation.

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“Particle Falls” http://forecastpublicart.org/public-art-review/current-projects/2015/03/particle-falls/ http://forecastpublicart.org/public-art-review/current-projects/2015/03/particle-falls/#comments Mon, 02 Mar 2015 13:00:18 +0000 http://forecastpublicart.org/?p=8988 Logan, Utah – Particle Falls, Andrea Polli and Chuck Varga’s environmental artwork, uses real-time visualization to expose air quality issues that are often ignored. It consists of a waterfall of blue light projected onto a building; the light turns fiery orange or red when there’s particulate pollution in the air. On view at Utah State … Read More

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Logan, Utah – Particle Falls, Andrea Polli and Chuck Varga’s environmental artwork, uses real-time visualization to expose air quality issues that are often ignored. It consists of a waterfall of blue light projected onto a building; the light turns fiery orange or red when there’s particulate pollution in the air. On view at Utah State University through April, Particle Falls has been shown in a number of other cities in the past few years, including San Jose, Philadelphia, Detroit, and Pittsburgh. The animation in this link is from the original San Jose showing in 2010 is designed for cell phone viewing. The video below shows Particle Falls in San Jose. The work was brought to the Utah by ARTsySTEM, an interdisciplinary initiative between the arts and sciences at the university.

Particle Falls from Andrea Polli on VimeoCreative Commons license.

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Homestead Act http://forecastpublicart.org/public-art-review/2015/02/homestead-act/ http://forecastpublicart.org/public-art-review/2015/02/homestead-act/#comments Fri, 27 Feb 2015 13:00:07 +0000 http://forecastpublicart.org/?p=8726 Alberta, Canada – To understand why Alberta artist Peter von Tiesenhausen copyrighted the land that he and his wife own, it helps to look with his eyes out the window of the studio he built himself on their remote 800 acres northwest of Grande Prairie. The copyright was a novel legal maneuver to prevent the … Read More

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Alberta, Canada – To understand why Alberta artist Peter von Tiesenhausen copyrighted the land that he and his wife own, it helps to look with his eyes out the window of the studio he built himself on their remote 800 acres northwest of Grande Prairie. The copyright was a novel legal maneuver to prevent the intrusion of a gas pipeline: The view provides the compelling rationale. Von Tiesenhausen looks across fields his father cleared as a homesteader in order to receive the title to the land—fields he spent his childhood riding through on horseback to check the family’s cattle for pink eye and hoof rot.

His eyes alight on the fence he began building 25 years ago when he decided to become an artist. After constructing the first eight feet of picket fence, he felt an internal shift. He’d made a commitment: “This would be something I would be doing for the rest of my life.” The rule he set for himself is simple: each year he is alive, the same materials—two-by-fours, one-by-fours, nails, a treated fence post, some white paint. Another eight feet.

“It’s this incredible shackle,” von Tiesenhausen acknowledges. He is tied to his land. But he also observes that at some point “a sense of stewardship kicked in.” He became even more keenly protective of the acres he has lived on since he was six years old.

So, in 1996, when the land negotiator and “some major dude” from Alliance Pipeline stopped by to discuss laying pipe to carry highly toxic gas through his property, von Tiesenhausen took them on a tour, pointing out objects he’d made and strategically placed, such as nests from willow branches perched in the trees. “This is not just a field or a forest,” he told them. “It’s an artwork. These things I’ve made are not isolated from the environment.”

The Lifeline fence is a prime example. The most recently completed end evokes the crisp white picket fence ideal of contented domesticity, but looking down the fence line, the paint begins to peel, the wood weathers, and finally the aspen trees push their way through, splitting the one-by-fours. “It’s very clear,” von Tiesenhausen says, “that that fence will not be there in one hundred years.”

Futility of “Ownership”

The fence, which does not actually fence anything in, is a powerful artistic statement about, among other things, the futility of ownership, a theme that resonates in the artist’s family history. Baltic Germans who settled in Estonia during the Crusades, von Tiesenhausen’s ancestors lost ownership of their land 700 years later during the Russian Revolution, and then had two weeks to vacate in the early days of World War II when the “nonaggression” pact between Hitler and Stalin assigned Estonia to the Soviet sphere of influence.

For von Tiesenhausen, whose first language was German and who wore lederhosen as a young Canadian lad, “the idea of being displaced people was always in my consciousness.” Despite understanding in a primal way how tenuous—even “ludicrous”—land ownership actually is, he nonetheless felt a strong urge to lay claim to the Alberta soil he’d grown up on, buying his first acres from his father when he was just 19. Or, to be precise, what he actually purchased, according to Canadian law, was the top six inches of the soil, to the depth of a plow.

“How can you own the sky?” von Tiesenhausen asks, with a nod to ancient cultures that found such a concept incomprehensible. Likewise, to copyright land, he acknowledges, is “absurd.” And yet he became willing to deal in such absurdities: If agribusinesscan copyright a seed, von Tiesenhausen figured he could copyright his acreage.

To the two pipeline ambassadors, he explained that altering the top six inches of his soil in any way—for example, by digging a trench to lay pipe—would constitute copyright infringement. They responded in the numerical language they knew, naming a really big number, ten times what they were offering other landowners in the area.

Von Tiesenhausen turned them down. Having a big pile of money on the table—and making the decision to walk away—was, he says, “one of the biggest blessings I’ve ever had in my life: I know where I stand and what I truly believe in. I’ve been tested.”

He also credits his renewed confidence in his own integrity with kicking his career up a notch. Within a year and a half, he claims to have brought in the same amount from new sales and commissions that the pipeline reps had offered. And if another oil or gas company representative attempted an offer, he charged $500 an hour to evaluate the proposal, keeping any meetings blissfully short.

The Space between Human and Land

Originally a landscape painter trying to “describe the land,” von Tiesenhausen’s career evolved as he began making things in the land, which then led to trying to have “a relationship with any land I find myself in.” These days, that might mean going to an exhibition ten days beforehand with just his ax to make a work on-site or perhaps creating from detritus found nearby.

That focus—on exploring the relationship between human beings and the land—crystallized in the work for which he is most widely known, The Watchers, five eight-foot-tall figures he carved from spruce and then charred with fire. From 1997 to 2002, von Tiesenhausen transported these haunting iconic figures in the back of his Ford pickup on what became a 30,000-kilometer journey across Canada, the itinerary determined by lecture and commission invitations. The Watchers even traversed the Northwest Passage on a Coast Guard icebreaker, their impassive presence overlooking the frozen scenery from aboard the uppermost deck.

To drive along with “five charred guys in a truck” gave von Tiesenhausen a heightened appreciation for how he is being perceived—how, in other words, he fits into his environment. And photos documenting The Watchers’ placement in urban and rural landscapes presents them as . . . well, watching, or perhaps watching over. Their forms raise questions about the human presence on the planet, which, paradoxically, photos of actual humans don’t necessarily evoke.

Land under Assault

Being closely aligned with the land also brings with it a heightened awareness of environmental threats, and on von Tiesenhausen’s northwestern Alberta property, those threats continue to loom large. The majestic grove of pine trees, under which he built his family’s house, was felled by the pine beetle scourge that is devastating pine forests across Alberta and neighboring British Columbia. The reason for the infestation? Many more of the tiny beetles survive the milder winters caused by global warming.

The need to use the timber before it rotted, the desire to revitalize the hamlet of 15 families where he lives, and the prospect of Canadian stimulus funding led von Tiesenhausen to take a four-year hiatus from formal art-making. Still, he describes the problems—the beetle-killed trees, rural decline, and economic collapse—in artistic terms, “as if they’re a palette with pigments.” The painting he hoped to create would be “the most sustainable community center anyone has ever seen”—and right in the middle of oil country no less, with giant tar sand pits just miles away and a natural-gas hot spot underfoot.

Initially turned down in no uncertain terms for stimulus funds, von Tiesenhausen eventually won over the government bureaucrats with a persistent email campaign showcasing bucolic photos of horses harvesting the beetle-kill pines. The Demmitt Community Centre opened in 2011 with a concert that packed 300 people (and turned another couple hundred away) into a timber frame hall constructed with straw bales, a recycled gym floor, and wood with the telltale blue tinge of pine beetle infestation.

The elegant building is eloquent testimony to von Tiesenhausen’s take on an artist’s job description—“making everything you do be part of that poetry of being alive.” That poetry has resonated with some unlikely converts, including the government workers who’d initially refused and then relented on the stimulus funding. They sent von Tiesenhausen a photo from their holiday party, their table centerpiece a gingerbread house replica of the sustainable community hall.

And then there’s the unsuccessful land negotiator from Alliance Pipeline. Von Tiesenhausen did eventually take some of his money. Even though the guy claimed not to even particularly like von Tiesenhausen’s work, he still had to have a piece of it. He forked over four figures for a mixed-media drawing that used the earth from von Tiesenhausen’s copyrighted land as pigment.

 

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Guesswho Gets Noticed http://forecastpublicart.org/public-art-review/2015/02/indian-street-artist-guesswho-attracts-international-notice/ http://forecastpublicart.org/public-art-review/2015/02/indian-street-artist-guesswho-attracts-international-notice/#comments Wed, 25 Feb 2015 13:00:05 +0000 http://forecastpublicart.org/?p=8965 Guesswho is a street artist practicing in Kochi (Cochin), a city in Kerala state on India’s southwest coast. The anonymous artist combines eastern imagery with images from western popular culture—often using multiple rendering styles in a single piece—and has been compared to Banksy. BBC recently interviewed Guesswho.   Images: Creative Commons license.

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Guesswho is a street artist practicing in Kochi (Cochin), a city in Kerala state on India’s southwest coast. The anonymous artist combines eastern imagery with images from western popular culture—often using multiple rendering styles in a single piece—and has been compared to Banksy. BBC recently interviewed Guesswho.

 

Images: Creative Commons license.

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“Nuestros Silencios (Our Silences)” http://forecastpublicart.org/public-art-review/current-projects/2015/02/nuestros-silencios-silences/ http://forecastpublicart.org/public-art-review/current-projects/2015/02/nuestros-silencios-silences/#comments Mon, 23 Feb 2015 16:13:48 +0000 http://forecastpublicart.org/?p=8906 San Diego, Calif. – An installation of monumental sculptures by the artist Rivelino will stand in San Diego’s Ruocco Park through April 15. Nuestros Silencios (Our Silences) consists of ten eleven-and-a-half-foot figural bronze sculptures arranged in rows. Each figure has a metal plate over its mouth and the figures do not face each other directly, … Read More

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San Diego, Calif. – An installation of monumental sculptures by the artist Rivelino will stand in San Diego’s Ruocco Park through April 15. Nuestros Silencios (Our Silences) consists of ten eleven-and-a-half-foot figural bronze sculptures arranged in rows. Each figure has a metal plate over its mouth and the figures do not face each other directly, raising issues around freedom of speech. Nuestros Silencios also includes a “Braille Box” containing smaller models of the sculptures that can be touched. This is the first time the artwork—presented by the Port of San Diego and the Consul General of Mexico—has appeared in the United States. Previously it has been shown in fourteen countries, including Portugal, Spain, Belgium, Italy, Germany, the United Kingdom, and Mexico. Rivelino arranges the sculptures differently depending upon the site, and the work takes on new significance in each context.

Image: Creative Commons license.

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“Airway” http://forecastpublicart.org/public-art-review/current-projects/2015/02/airway/ http://forecastpublicart.org/public-art-review/current-projects/2015/02/airway/#comments Fri, 20 Feb 2015 18:13:26 +0000 http://forecastpublicart.org/?p=8909 El Paso, Texas – Completed in 2014, the large-scale Airway Aesthetic Improvement Project (Airway) by Vicki Scuri builds upon existing infrastructure to form a gateway to El Paso International Airport and downtown. Airway extends over 2,000 linear feet and consists of 50-foot, functional, illuminated wind turbines with customized radial armatures, low illuminated sculptures, arched planters for … Read More

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El Paso, Texas – Completed in 2014, the large-scale Airway Aesthetic Improvement Project (Airway) by Vicki Scuri builds upon existing infrastructure to form a gateway to El Paso International Airport and downtown. Airway extends over 2,000 linear feet and consists of 50-foot, functional, illuminated wind turbines with customized radial armatures, low illuminated sculptures, arched planters for native plants, and a variety of other lighting and paving elements. By generating wind power and incorporating xeriscaping, landscaping that conserves water, Airway takes advantage of local ecology to promote sustainability. The project’s design refers to images of flight and local plant life and landscape features in addition to industrial and commercial building forms of the area. The City of El Paso commissioned the project with the city’s transportation agency, Camino Real Regional Mobility Authority (CRRMA), and the Texas Department of Transportation. Learn more about this project and Vicki Scuri in her terrific interview with Los Herrajeros.

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Now You See Me: International Public Art Short Film Contest http://forecastpublicart.org/forecast/2015/02/now-see-international-public-art-short-film-contest/ http://forecastpublicart.org/forecast/2015/02/now-see-international-public-art-short-film-contest/#comments Wed, 18 Feb 2015 22:12:25 +0000 http://forecastpublicart.org/?p=8974 Randy Walker‘s Filling the Void was the subject of John Akre’s short film that was one of 8 films selected to be screened at the Louvre in Paris on January 30, 2015. The films were chosen out of a pool of 72 for the Now You See Me international public art short film contest. Walker collaborated with the youth … Read More

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Randy Walker‘s Filling the Void was the subject of John Akre’s short film that was one of 8 films selected to be screened at the Louvre in Paris on January 30, 2015. The films were chosen out of a pool of 72 for the Now You See Me international public art short film contest. Walker collaborated with the youth of Kulture Klub Collaborative at YouthLink in Minneapolis on his installation, creating a framework to be filled gradually over time by the youth and staff of Youthlink as well as family members, friends, and curious passersby. The film was created by John Akre with Deacon Warner and IFP Minnesota.

Now You See Me contest winners (film title, director, public art project featured):

Sliding Flora, by Talya Lavie. Golem, Niki de Saint Phalle, Jerusalem, Israel, 1972

BRUUMRUUM!, by Diane Toucedo. BRUUMRUUM!, David Torrents/Artec3 Studio, Barcelona, Spain, 2013

All the Data That’s to Process, by Jane Nisselson. Moveable Type, Ben Rubin & Mark Hansen, USA, 2007

Filling the Void, by Deacon Warner/John Akre. Filling the Void, Randy Walker, Minneapolis, USA, 2013

The Revival of the Columns of Buren, by Anne Maregiano. The two platforms (les deux plateaux), Daniel Buren, Paris, 1985-86

Launch Pad for Consciousness, by Ezry Keydar. Field of Rocks, Ezra Orion, Desert Garden of Sculptures, Mitzpe Ramon, Israel, 1986

SO DA DÜSSELDORF, by Kuesti Fraun. UV-A UV-B, Stefan Sous, Düsseldorf, Germany, 2002

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Robert Indiana’s “Seven” Stirs Controversy http://forecastpublicart.org/public-art-review/2015/02/installation-robert-indianas-seven-stirs-controversy/ http://forecastpublicart.org/public-art-review/2015/02/installation-robert-indianas-seven-stirs-controversy/#comments Mon, 16 Feb 2015 21:50:19 +0000 http://forecastpublicart.org/?p=8872 Portland, Maine – Robert Indiana’s sculpture Seven now sits outside the Portland Museum of Art at 7 Congress Square. Known for his contributions to the Pop art movement, Indiana conceived of the series NUMBERS ONE through ZERO in the 1980s and made Seven in the 1990s. In a recent opinion piece, local poet Martin Steingesser … Read More

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Portland, Maine – Robert Indiana’s sculpture Seven now sits outside the Portland Museum of Art at 7 Congress Square. Known for his contributions to the Pop art movement, Indiana conceived of the series NUMBERS ONE through ZERO in the 1980s and made Seven in the 1990s. In a recent opinion piece, local poet Martin Steingesser questions the museum’s decision to place it there. The large, number-shaped sculpture, he argues, is more like a “pricey door ornament” than art that engages fully with public space. Others share his disappointment, and some have even responded with vandalism. In describing his concerns, Steingesser begins to outline a standard for more “resonant” and emotionally engaging public art, contributing to a larger dialogue.

 

If you like this story, you might be interested in our story about the movement of Alexander Calder’s The Eagle. Following the 1999 move of the iconic sculpture from its Fort Worth home to Philadelphia and then Seattle, a heated debate began. Fifteen years later, Homecoming! Committee’s inflatable sculpture The Eagle Has Landed popped up all over Fort Worth, generating discussion about iconic art in the city.

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Making It Public Workshop Series http://forecastpublicart.org/forecast/2015/02/making-public-workshop-series/ http://forecastpublicart.org/forecast/2015/02/making-public-workshop-series/#comments Thu, 12 Feb 2015 19:00:26 +0000 http://forecastpublicart.org/?p=8938 Forecast Public Art is excited to announce the second year of Making It Public, a five-part capacity building workshop series to help artists explore how to bring their work into the public realm. Created to engage artists new to working in public art at a time when there are increasing invitations for artists to participate … Read More

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Forecast Public Art is excited to announce the second year of Making It Public, a five-part capacity building workshop series to help artists explore how to bring their work into the public realm.

Created to engage artists new to working in public art at a time when there are increasing invitations for artists to participate in the design of public spaces, the program will culminate in awarding 2 – 3 small project grants to workshop attendees for public art projects in Lowertown, St. Paul. All participants will receive follow up artist consulting from Forecast staff free of charge.

We will announce in early March the exact date and time when the registration will open. Sign up for our enewsletter to receive updates about this opportunity.

Program Details

  • Five workshops facilitated by experts from Forecast Public Art with guest panelists.
  • New this year: Project proposal development coaching and implementation of up to three public art projects to be selected by a community panel.
  • Workshops will cover topics such as cross-sector collaboration, site analysis, community engagement, permitting, conservation, proposal preparation, project management, and project ideation.
  • Participants will be eligible for free consulting from Forecast staff.

Workshop Details

  • Wednesdays, late April – May, 6-9pm.
  • Workshops will take place at multiple locations in and around Lowertown, St. Paul (e.g., Bedlam Lowertown, Minnesota State Arts Board, Minnesota Museum of American Art).
  • The program is made possible with funding from the Lowertown Future Fund and is offered at no cost to the artists.

Participant Qualifications

  • Artists of all media forms are welcome to participate. Limit 20.
  • Acceptance based on a first-come, first-served basis, with preference given to artists that live/work in Lowertown.
  • Artists may not have completed more than one public art project with a budget greater than $1,000.
  • Participants must commit to attending all 5 sessions.

This workshop is facilitated by Kirstin Wiegman and Carrie Christensen. Please contact Kirstin at kirstin@forecastpublicart.org with questions.

This workshop series is made possible by Lowertown Future Fund.

 

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