Issue 46 — Food for Thought

Published

Food For Thought – Food gets people’s attention. That’s one reason public artists are using it effectively as an artistic medium. Food offers multisensory experiences for audiences, encouraging curiosity, questions, and delight. It also provides an intimate way for artists to learn about and address the needs of communities and sites. In the following pages you’ll read about the challenges artists face when they work with food, the various ways they’re using food to address social, political, and environmental issues, and ways audiences naturally come together around food-based projects to eat, experience, and think.

With world population expected to reach 9 billion by 2050, food is a major global issue. We’re faced with the failures of industrialized agriculture and declining health due to poor nutrition. At the same time, we’re seeing the flowering of farm-to-table initiatives and millions of Americans returning to backyard vegetable gardening.

In this issue of Public Art Review, we will explore how contemporary artists are creating innovative ways to invite the public to explore such food issues and how they affect politics, place, community, creativity, and sustainability. Food also provides an intimate way for artists to learn about and address the needs of communities and sites. “Food for Thought” presents the challenges artists face when they work with food, the various ways they’re using food to address social, political, and environmental issues, and ways audiences naturally come together around food-based projects to eat, experience, and think.

“Food for Thought” includes a new Shop Talk department, which looks at the latest trends in public policy, funding, and technology alongside conference reports, recent awards, and more. We’ve revamped our Books section to give you the latest on what others are publishing in the field, and Recent Projects (both U.S. and International) rounds out the issue.

Bon appétit!

 

On the cover: Adjacent to Pittsburgh’s The Waffle Shop, Conflict Kitchen is a take-out window that serves food from countries with which the United States is in conflict. Shown here is the Iranian version of the project. Conflict Kitchen has also served food from Afghanistan and Venezuela. Photo courtesy Conflict Kitchen. See You Are What You Eat: Three explorations of food and place by Jon Spayde.

Books

Building Lessons

Explorations of architectural forms offer insights for public artists

Vhils

Vhils; Introduction by Marc and Sara Schiller (Wooster Collective)

Featured

Art on the Farm

The Wormfarm Institute puts the culture back in agriculture

Food Hazards

Artists Dish On Working With Food

Taking it to the Streets

Artists hit the road using creativity, communication, and food to address social issues

The Temporary Table

Events that start with dinner and spark deeper thinking about economics and aesthetics

Magazine Feature

Art on the Farm

The Wormfarm Institute puts the culture back in agriculture

Food Hazards

Artists Dish On Working With Food

Taking it to the Streets

Artists hit the road using creativity, communication, and food to address social issues

The Temporary Table

Events that start with dinner and spark deeper thinking about economics and aesthetics

The Temporary Table

Events that start with dinner and spark deeper thinking about economics and aesthetics

News

On Location

Canadian Vision

Toronto’s waterfront redevelopment models a new process with public art—involving artists right from the start

Recent Projects

“Industrial Harvest”

Speculative Art: Sarah Kavage’s project compared actual wheat to a “wheat future”

“Mall-Terations”

Artists: Carolina Cisneros, Marcelo Ertorteguy, Mateo Pinto, and Sara Valente

“Urbanology”

Interactive Art Planning by the BMW Guggenheim Lab

Sweet Spot

With community kids, Stevie Famulari turned a forest into Sugarland

Shop Talk

Back to the Land Art

By rethinking the legacy of the 1960s land art movement, artists and institutions are redefining environmental art

Bread and Circuses

London's Olympic Arts Programming Fails To Make A Lasting Impact

From the Gallery to the Streets

The Walker Art Center’s new curator of public practice explores the museum’s role in process-oriented art