• WE TURN YOUR PUBLIC ART AND PLACEMAKING IDEAS INTO REALITY

  • WE SUPPORT ARTISTS WHO WORK IN PUBLIC SPACES

  • WE KEEP YOU INFORMED AND ON TREND

What Kind of Future do we want to Build Together?

How can public art help us build the future we want? We ask you to invest in Forecast to keep public art thriving even as the world changes.
Please give what you can through May 31st.

Forecast fosters dynamic, inclusive and resilient communities through public art, community-engaged design and transformative placemaking. We improve our collective life through a unique combination of responsive consulting services, support for public artists, and abundant resources on current issues and trends. Forecast is a nonprofit 501(c)(3) organization.

WHAT’S HAPPENING AT FORECAST

in a gentle rainstorm an umbrella floats over the text creative alternatives to in-person arts-based activities

We are pleased to release a toolkit with strategies for adapting in-person arts-based activities during the pandemic. We are launching the first iteration now, and will develop it based on your input. On May 6 Forecast consultants will present case studies.

On Thursday, May 21, multidisciplinary visual artist Moira Villiard will dive into her experience as a Forecast 2019 Early-Career Project Grantee. The focuses of her current artistic practice include exploring the overlap of Indigenous concepts and history with contemporary narratives in public art and finding ways to answer the question of “What’s missing?” through creative placemaking. Please Register to receive webinar access info.

graphic with the words Saturday Night Artist Release

Join Forecast consultants and guests every Saturday evening through May 30 at 8:00 pm CDT, for a series of Zoom meet-ups for Black, Indigenous & POC artists and organizers working in community and in public space. Hosted by Forecast consultants Candida Gonzalez and Tricia Heuring, with special guest co-hosts Felicia Perry and Sarah White.

grid of 13 artist grantee portraits and two Forecast logos

Because we received hundreds of incredible applications for our first round of 20 Mini-Grants, we raised funds to support additional artists. We are thrilled to be able to fund 10 more projects now.

We are offering pro bono consultations to any public artist or public art administrator based in the U.S. or the Native nations that share the same geography from now until May 31, 2020, as a response to the mounting effects of the coronavirus pandemic.

portrait grid of twenty artists

Forecast asked artists how we can best help them and their communities NOW. In response, we reallocated $10,000 of our own resources to quickly provide mini-grants to 20 public artists to safely create and share messages of hope within their communities. 

COVID-19 RESOURCES

Forecast is highly attuned to the economic impact of this pandemic on artists. We’ve made Public Art Review free, and are compiling and providing other artist resources, including lists of emergency relief and opportunities, a new toolkit of creative alternatives to in-person arts-based activities to keep people working and events moving forward, and pro bono consulting for public artists and public art administrators.

Click on the banner below to start browsing Public Art Review issue 59, which is expandable to full screen via the brackets in the banner’s lower right corner.
To browse more digital issues, use the See More link in the banner’s upper right corner, or visit Forecast’s Issuu page to access every available issue.

41 years of supporting groundbreaking work in public spaces

ISSUES THAT MATTER

Portrait of Victoria Jones, director of Memphis arts nonprofit the CLTV

Insight | The CLTV, a Memphis arts organization, is planning housing that will generate revenue.

Explore More | After disasters, artists are ready to play an official role in relief and recovery.

Forecast executive director Theresa Sweetland, left, and Public Art Review editor in chief Karen Olson, right

In a divided time, it’s clear we’re better together.

Editor’s and Publisher’s Note, from the 59th issue of Public Art Review.